replace


replace
replace, displace, supplant, supersede are rarely interchangeable terms, but they can carry the same basic meaning—to put a person or thing out of his or its place or into the place of another.
Replace implies supplying a substitute for what has been lost, destroyed, used up, worn out, or dismissed
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a broken toy should not be immediately replaced if it has been broken by the child's care-lessness— Russell

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replace a servant

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constant flow of conversation from dawn till dark . . . only to be replaced by a night shift of resounding snores— Theodore Sturgeon

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or it may imply a preferring of one of two or more things that could satisfy a need
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nor would I admit that the human actor can be replaced by a marionette— T. S. Eliot

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and sometimes it implies a putting back into a proper or assigned place
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replace a book on a shelf

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the guard soon replaced his blunderbuss in his arm-chest— Dickens

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Displace implies a dislodging, ousting, or putting or crowding out followed by a replacing. This dual implication of putting out of place and of replacing is the chief distinction of displace in contrast with replace
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the weight of water displaced by a floating body is equal to that of the displacing body

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However one of these ideas is sometimes stressed more than the other so that the emphasis is either on ousting
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American democracy was the response to challenge of Europeans displaced to a continental wilderness and cut loose from many ancient ties— Dorothy Thompson

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or on replacing
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as he became more conscious of the bar accounts, of the kitchen expenses, the benevolence was displaced by calculation— Gorer

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Supplant basically implies a dispossessing or ousting by craft, fraud, or treachery and a taking or usurping of the place, possessions, or privileges of the one dispossessed or ousted
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you three from Milan did supplant good Prospero— Shak.

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the pretty young wife finds herself in the humiliating position of having been supplanted by a brisk, unlovely woman— Bullett

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eager to succeed Louis and even to supplant him— Belloc

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But supplant sometimes implies an uprooting and replacing rather than a dispossessing and usurping; in such cases trickery or treachery is no longer implied
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his tutor tried to supplant his fears by arousing his sense of curiosity

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don't claim that the Divine revelation has been supplanted . . . but that it has been amplified— Mackenzie

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the architect, to serve the vogue, uptilts greenhouses thirty stories high on stilts, supplanting walls of stone with sheets of glass— Hillyer

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Supersede implies a causing of another to be set aside, abandoned, or rejected as inferior, no longer of use or value, or obsolete
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the old-fashioned fishing luggers with their varicolored sails have been superseded by motorboats— Amer. Guide Series: La.

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that is the worst of erudition —that the next scholar sucks the few drops of honey that you have accumulated, sets right your blunders, and you are supersededBenson

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Analogous words: restore, *renew: *change, alter: *recover, regain, recoup, retrieve

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • replace — re‧place [rɪˈpleɪs] verb [transitive] 1. to start being used, doing a job etc instead of something or someone else: • The tax replaces a levy of 13.5% on manufactured goods. • He will be replaced as chief executive by the current finance director …   Financial and business terms

  • Replace — Re*place (r? pl?s ), v. t. [Pref. re + place: cf. F. replacer.] 1. To place again; to restore to a former place, position, condition, or the like. [1913 Webster] The earl . . . was replaced in his government. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To refund;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • replace — replace, substitute 1. The typical construction is to replace A with B (or, in the passive, B is replaced by A), or B can simply replace A, whereas with substitute it is to substitute B for A or to substitute B without any continuation (more… …   Modern English usage

  • replace — [ri plās′] vt. replaced, replacing 1. to place again; put back in a former or the proper place or position 2. to take the place of; supplant [workers replaced by automated equipment] 3. to provide a substitute or equivalent for [to replace a worn …   English World dictionary

  • replace — I verb act for, alternate, change, commute, compensate, cover for, depute, deputize, duplicate, exchange, fill in for, interchange, make amends, pay back, put back, refund, reimburse, reinstall, reinstate, repay, reponere, represent, restitute,… …   Law dictionary

  • replacé — replacé, ée (re pla sé, sée) part. passé de replacer. La statue de Napoléon Ier replacée sur la colonne de la place Vendôme …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • replace — 1590s, to restore to a previous place, from RE (Cf. re ) back, again + PLACE (Cf. place) (v.). Meaning to take the place of is recorded from 1733 …   Etymology dictionary

  • replace — [v] take the place of; put in place of alter, back up, change, compensate, displace, fill in, follow, front for*, give back, mend, oust, outplace, patch, pinch hit for*, put back, reconstitute, recoup, recover, redeem, redress, reestablish,… …   New thesaurus

  • replacé — Replacé, [replac]ée. part …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • replace — ► VERB 1) take the place of. 2) provide a substitute for. 3) put back in a previous place or position. DERIVATIVES replaceable adjective replacer noun …   English terms dictionary


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